Toledo Public Schools, an Ohio Public School District, participates in the Medicaid School Program.

The district is seeking advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) or licensed physician assistants (PA) to complete record reviews and refer children for therapy services (occupational, physical and speech therapy and audiology) provided in a school setting. These students are fully evaluated/assessed by the licensed providers, and services are also delivered by the same licensed practitioners of the healing arts, within their scope of practice, in accordance with Ohio licensure laws. Each student has an individualized educational plan (IEP) of care specific to the school setting.

Toledo Public Schools is building a temporary team of providers to serve until August 1, 2016, since licensed therapists in Ohio cannot serve as an Ordering, Referring or Prescribing (OPR) provider for the Medicaid program. Hired professionals must hold a current license as an APRN, be enrolled in Ohio Medicaid as an 'ORP only' or 'ORP' provider and have a National Provider Identifier (NPI) number as well.

Payment will be based per record review and related referral at $25.00/record, up to $75.00/hour. Work is flexible part time hours from your home via Internet access. Some positions are available onsite. Permanent part-time positions to be considered at the completion of the summer project.

To learn more, go to Job Opportunities under the Employment tab on the home page of


Scott High School students Charlvon Gaston (student body president) and Blake Minter (valedictorian) proudly wore special stoles when they graduated recently.

Those stoles represented that they had successfully completed the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program, which works to close the achievement gap by preparing all students to complete high school and be ready for college or success in the global economy. Scott High School was one of the first schools in the district to implement the program.

The AVID program offers teachers, students, community partners and parents a common language towards instruction and clear expectations of college and career readiness for ALL students.

Using WICOR (writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization and reading) strategies as a way for students to prepare for the rigors of college or the career world, AVID has proved so successful at Scott and Woodward High School that it is being implemented in more and more Toledo Public Schools elementary schools.

Click here to read more about this unique program: AVID 

Or you can look closer to home for AVID success stories: Charlvon will be playing football this fall at Baldwin-Wallace University in Berea, Ohio, while Blake is heading to Daytona Beach, Fl. to attend Bethune-Cookman University, where she plans to major in Business Administration.

Posted on June 23, 2016

Toledo Public Schools and the University of Toledo have been collaborating since 2011 to deliver the UT@TPS program, designed to make college education more accessible to adults in the greater Toledo area while building a college-going culture in central city schools.

Their latest collaboration, Teach Toledo, is an initiative to recruit local students to pursue an associate of arts degree at UT that has a focus on urban education. Now is the time to register for this unique program, which is offered in a community-based, supportive environment (some classes will be conducted at TPS's Jones Leadership Academy on Nebraska Avenue). Students in this program will be involved in a TPS classroom experience from day one and they will learn the content skills and knowledge necessary to be effective teachers in an urban school district.

Plus, Teach Toledo students receive partial tuition scholarships.

Dr. Romules Durant, the CEO/Superintendent of TPS, is strong supporter of the new program. "As a TPS and UT graduate, I know the power of teaching in our city, which is why I believe in Teach Toledo."

To learn more about the program and to request information, click here: Teach Toledo

And remember, Teach Toledo will provide aspiring teachers with opportunities to:

  • Work in an urban school building in order to have extensive experience interacting with the children, families and communities in urban settings (aligns with the Association of Teacher Educators (ATE) standards for teacher education);
  • Interact with peers from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds with a common purpose of improving urban education;
  • Understand the culture and history of racially and ethnically diverse U.S. populations, via University of Toledo associate of arts degree general education core requirements;
  • Become part of a community of practice in which novices and experts work together, combining learning with action;
  • Receive necessary information and support regarding management of finances, time and other resources to enable successful completion of degree.

Posted on June 21, 2016

The University of Michigan.  The University of Cincinnati. The University of Toledo. Siena Heights University.  These are just four of the 23 schools in six states that student athletes from Toledo Public Schools will be playing sports at next year.

As a last chance to thank these athletes and to wish them well, Toledo Public Schools hosted a College Signing Night for 33 student athletes on Monday, May 23, at Woodward High School.

Marcus Ray, currently president of his own publishing company, a motivational speaker and a Big Ten Network analyst – not to mention a part of the 1997 national football champions from the University of Michigan -- was the keynote speaker at the event.

Toledo Public Schools has once again partnered with the Associated General Contractors of Northwest Ohio (AGC of NW Ohio) to offer a summer Construction Camp for students who are interested in the fields associated with construction.

Last week, 25 students from high schools across the district visited local jobsites to learn more about what it takes to become a successful skilled tradesperson.

Mary Gregory, executive vice president of the AGC of NW Ohio, knows how important it is to engage students early so they get a true understanding of the construction field.

“Experts have declared that for every 10 jobs that are currently available, one requires an applicant to have a master’s degree or higher, two require a bachelor’s degree and the remaining seven jobs require credentials and skills that are better developed in practical programs such as an apprenticeship, a two-year associate degree or certificate program,” Ms. Gregory says.

Students toured several local construction sites including the new ProMedica Toledo Hospital Generations Tower project, the Mercy Health Partner Oncology project and two renovation jobs at Bowling Green State University.

These visits featured jobsite tours and lunch with crew members, as well as hands-on construction activities. The goal was to help interested students understand the math and science skills, as well as the mechanical aptitude, needed for these jobs.

Don Huss, secretary/treasurer of Ohio/Kentucky Bricklayers Local 3, helped coordinate the Construction Camp visits and projects.

“It requires many industry resources to offer construction jobsite visits to high school students,” Mr. Huss explained. “The more students and educators are exposed to the vast number of career paths available in the construction industry, the more local skilled tradespeople we can develop.”

Posted on June 9, 2016